Talking Stick

Raven Eagle Talking Stick carved by George Matllpi

My experience

The nature of the talking stick provides us the opportunity to speak from our hearts and mind. When used in a peace circle it provides the circle to process what is being said and be heard without judgement. It paces our time. When the stick is passed to you, it is only your words being spoken. With intent, your words are received with openness and provide a path to understanding. It’s a tool of communication to solve problems or to gather deeper insights in any situation.

The beauty of the talking stick is the golden moments of thought process we share with reflection, respect and consideration. While the collective sounds of our heartbeat paces our thoughts, we courageously find our voice to share in a peace circle without interruptions. It takes time, presence and mindfulness.

Each time I participated in a circle-surprising encounters of awareness occurs, resulting in a deeper sense of appreciation for humanity. This tradition is so valuable and vital to our ways of communication, if only we can use it more in our systems such as law, government, schools, mediation…did I mention gov’t?

I would like to share my gratitude to Dr. Evelyn Zellerer, founder of Peace of the Circle, for her graceful and impeccable directions and facilitation training on leading a peace circle at my work place, Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House. My experiences were always positive feelings of enlightenment and a sense of common ground.

The photo represents the talking stick given to me as a gift from a friend of mine named Rudy/George Matilpi (First Nations carver Kwakiutl from Alert Bay). It is depicting the Raven and majestic Eagle. I am grateful for his gift and I will use it in our future work with community.

I am honored.

With much love, gratitude, understanding, and friendship.

Eva

I would like to acknowledge that I live, work and play on the unceded and traditional territories of the Coast Salish peoples – sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), sel̓íl̓witulh (Tsleil  Waututh) and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) first nations.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s